Online Courses Offered

Online Courses Offered

The following courses are offered fully online through
Iowa Wesleyan College:

ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting – 3 hrs.
Introduction to reporting financial information regarding the operating, investing and financing activities of business enterprises to present and potential investors, creditors and others.

ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting – 3 hrs.
Managerial accounting is concerned with the development and use of accounting information as it applies to the decision-making process. Attention is given to cost behavior, cost analysis and budget development. Successful completion of this course will enable students to prepare and explain detailed financial reports required by management.

ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I 3 hrs.
Study of the theory and practice of preparation of external financial reports for the corporate form of business. Income statement and statement of comprehensive income are explored with special emphasis on revenue recognition. Special topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money and the conceptual framework.  Additional topics include classification, valuation and presentation of current assets, fixed assets and intangible assets. Students successfully completing this course will be able to develop and explain advanced financial reports for management and/or outside authorities.
 
ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II 3 hrs.
Study of the theory and practice of preparation of external financial reports for the corporate form of business. Classification, valuation and presentation of investments, current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and shareholders’ equity will be explored.  Special topics include derivatives, accounting changes and correction of errors, earnings per share calculations, preparation of statement of cash flows, and accounting for contingencies, bonds, leases, income taxes, pensions and other postretirement benefits. Students successfully completing this course will be able to develop and explain advanced financial reports for management and/or outside authorities.
 
ACTG 322 Cost Accounting 3 hrs.
A study of the generation and use of cost data for cost measurement, cost control and managerial purposes. This is an advanced managerial accounting course. Students successfully completing this course will be able to prepare and explain advanced financial reports to management.

ACTG 340  Federal Tax I 3 hrs.
Provides background in federal income tax law and the regulations of the Treasury Department. The course also deals primarily with basic philosophy of taxation, taxable income, allowable deductions and gains, losses of sales and exchanges of property for the individual taxpayer. This course serves also as an introduction to the federal taxation of partnerships and corporations. Discusses tax planning alternatives.  Students successfully completing this course will be able to describe, identify, and report the types of income that are subject to federal tax.
 
ACTG 342 Federal Tax II 3 hrs.
This course examines in greater depth federal income tax law and regulations applicable to partnerships, corporations, and fiduciaries. Also covers federal gift and estate tax principles, reorganizations, personal holding companies, and the accumulated earnings tax. Emphasizes tax planning, including timing of transactions, appropriate form of transactions and election of methods when alternative methods are available under the law. Students successfully completing this course will be able to prepare required tax reports and explain the federal tax environment faced by the modern business.
 
ACTG 430 Advanced Accounting 3 hrs.
A study of accounting and procedures related to business combinations particularly as related to the preparation of consolidated financial statements. Students successfully completing this course will be able to describe and explain the financial complications that arise with business mergers and acquisitions.
 
ACTG 431 Auditing, Principles and Procedures 3 hrs.
A study of the function of the independent CPA in regard to the examination of financial statements. Considerable attention is devoted to the purpose of the audit, the responsibilities of the CPA in rendering his opinion, liability of the auditor, planning of the audit, and limitations of the audit. Students successfully completing this course will be able to explain and describe an outside audit of a firm.
 
ACTG 450 Government and Nonprofit Accounting 3 hrs.
Study of principles and procedures followed in accounting for the operation of governmental and nonprofit organizations. Successful students in this course will be able to explain and describe the accepted methods of accounting for government and nonprofit firms, as compared to for-profit firms.
 
ART 203 Art Appreciation 3 hrs.
A topical and historical approach to understanding fundamental aesthetic principles as apparent in great works of painting, drawing, sculpture and architecture. Recommended for non-majors who wish to broaden understanding of the field. Students will gain a vocabulary of design and art terms. Application of this knowledge will then be applied to visual elements of art and architecture as they related to world culture
 
BA 100 Survey of Business - 3 hrs.
A survey of the structure and functions of the American business system is provided,
together with an overview of business organization, accounting, finance, principles of
management, economics, marketing, personnel and the interdependence of business,
the community and government. Upon successful completion of the course, the
student will be able to describe and explain the basic internal functional areas of a
business, and their relationship to outside stakeholders.

BA 310 Principles of Management - 3 hrs.
This course is a study of the basic principles, concepts, theories and analytical tools
in management. Topics include introduction to management, planning and decisionmaking,
organizing for stability and change, leading and controlling. Consideration
will be given to both theoretical and practical aspects of management. Students
completing this course successfully will be able to describe both the theoretical background
and practical applications of popular business management principles and
strategies.

BA 311 Small Business Management – 3 hrs.
Focus is on effective management of small business firms. The management process includes not only strategy determination, but also the varied activities necessary in planning, organizing, actuating and controlling small business operations. Emphasis is placed upon those aspects of small business management that are uniquely important to small firms.

BA 312 Analysis of Organizational Behavior – 3 hrs.
Enables the student to apply the concepts learned in various business administration, accounting and economics courses to real-life cases and in-depth studies of business organizations and their participants.

BA 320 Principles of Marketing - 3 hrs.
A study of the problems involved in making marketing decisions for the consumer
and organizational markets. Study includes the price of the product, the promotion of
the product, and the channels of distribution for the product. Successful completion
of the course will enable the student to make sound product, price, distribution, and
promotion decisions for a specific product or service offering.

BA 330 Business Law 3 hrs.
A study of traditional business law topics - contracts, sales, torts, agency, business organizations and other basic topics. Successful completion of this course will enable students to understand and use business law principles to guide sound business decisions.
 
BA 332 Administrative and Personnel Law 3 hrs.
This course studies the effects of administrative and personnel laws on the decision making responsibilities of employers, employees and Human Resource Practitioners.  It explores the impact of personnel policies and practices of organizations and addresses the development, intent and implications of protective legislation from the federal to the local level. Upon completing the course the student will be able to demonstrate understanding in legal and regulatory factors in personnel law; laws affecting employers, employees and contractors; identifying elements in a total compensation system/pay rules; job analysis, description and evaluation; union and management legal requirements; rules governing employee benefit and leave programs; and basic procedures to manage a compensation system.

BA 333 Psychology of Business and Industry - 3 hrs.
Psychology as applied to problems of personnel selection and evaluation, prevention
of accidents, promotion of work efficiency, morale, advertising, and human factors
engineering. At the conclusion of the course, successful students can demonstrate the
ability to analyze (from a philosophical and practical viewpoint) how people and the
workplace interact; how to maximize the positive relationship between employee and
employer; techniques of job and employee assessment; and performance enhancements
such as morale, health/safety, motivation technique and group behavior.

BA 340 Corporate Financial Management – 3 hrs.
Introduces the student to the goals and objectives of financial management within the corporate setting. Students will become familiar with functions of the various financial areas, the development and use of information by the financial manager and the various analytical tools and techniques used. Successful completion of this course will enable students to make sound, risk-sensitive financial decisions for their business. Emphasis will be placed upon financial decision making.

BA 350 Business Information Systems - 3 hrs.
A study of the uses of the digital computer in the functional areas of business administration.
Major emphasis will be directed to analysis, design and implementation of
Management Information Systems. Students successfully completing this course will
be able to critically analyze the efficiency and effectiveness of business information
systems.

BA 360 Human Resource Management - 3 hrs.
Principles and practices in recruitment, selection, staffing and compensation of personnel.
Consideration of the impact of government regulations, and other environmental
forces on human resource management in the workplace. Students successfully
completing the course will be able to describe and apply a variety of practical,
theory-based solutions to common human resource management problems and
challenges.

BA 350 Business Information Systems – 3 hrs.
A study of the uses of the digital computer in the functional areas of business administration. Major emphasis will be directed to analysis, design and implementation of management information systems. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to critically analyze the efficiency and effectiveness of business information systems. .

BA 360 Human Resource Management – 3 hrs.
Principles and practices in recruitment, selection, staffing and compensation of personnel. Consideration of the impact of government regulations, and other environmental forces on human resource management in the workplace. Students successfully completing the course will be able to describe and apply a variety of practical, theory-based solutions to common human resource management problems and challenges.

BA 362 Compensation and Benefits 3 hrs.
Examines various rewards systems (including financial) in organizations and studies relevant theoretical and legal perspectives. At the conclusion of the course, the successful student will be able to: identify and describe the federal legislation impact on compensation and benefit plans; explain how an organization’s total compensation system promotes external competitiveness and internal effectiveness; articulate methods of analyzing jobs, evaluating the internal worth of jobs and redesigning positions; determine a cost-effective base pay and incentive pay structure; identify key features of a variety of benefit plans; and analyze strategic issues in designing pay structures, administering benefit plans, containing health-care costs and communicating the
system to employees.
 
BA 370 Operations Management 3 hrs.
Operations management is the study of activities required for the efficient and effective selection of inputs to produce economical and profitable outputs for both manufacturing and service firms. Quantitative solutions derived with the use of a variety of analytical tools will be used. Upon completion of the course, the student will understand production and service systems inputs, processes, and outputs. The student will also gain a further understanding of quantitative solution development in the functional areas of management, marketing, accounting, finance, and human resources management. 
 
BA 419 Business Strategy - 3 hrs.

This course focuses on the competitive strategy of the firm by examining issues
central to the firm’s long- and short-term competitive position. The course develops a
set of analytical frameworks that enable students to explain performance differences
among firms and that, in turn, provide a structure for making strategic decisions to
enhance the firm’s future competitive positions. This course functions as the capstone
course for the Accounting and Business Administration majors.

CHEM 105 General Chemistry I –4 hrs.
This course is an introduction into the general topics of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonds, mole relationships, states of matter, acids and bases, reaction rates, equilibria, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.
 
CJ 231 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 hrs.
A survey of the major components of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, and corrections. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the American criminal justice structure and functions, distinguish between consensus and conflict models of the criminal justice system and explain the meaning of due process and equal protection under the law.
 
CJ 260 Criminal Law and Individual Rights 3 hrs.
This course covers substantive criminal law and criminal procedure. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate the origins of criminal law; identify the elements of various types of crime and defenses to criminal acts; and discuss constitutional protections related to search and seizure, due process, doublejeopardy, rights against self-incrimination, rights to an attorney, rights to a jury trial and court decisions on cruel and unusual punishments.
 
CJ 316 Introduction to Corrections 3 hrs.
An overview of the history and contemporary development of the field of corrections.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate philosophies of punishment, discuss correctional law and inmate rights, and evaluate correctional programs to rehabilitate correctional clients.
 
ECN 101 Microeconomics 3 hrs.
Topics in this course include the behavior of individual households and firms, supply and demand analysis, and the various structures of a market economy. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and explain the major economic forces faced by a single firm in a capitalistic setting.
 
ECN 102 Macroeconomics 3 hrs.
This course is designed for the general student as well as for the student considering further study in business administration, accounting or economics. This course develops basic economic theory to explain unemployment, inflation and economic growth and considers the role of governmental economic stabilization policy.  Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and explain the major economic forces faced by groups of firms in a capitalistic setting.  Prerequisite: ECN 101.

ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business 3 hrs.
Statistical methods commonly used in the analysis of empirical data are considered, including descriptive and inferential statistics, and parametric and nonparametric techniques. Computer applications and the relationship between statistics and research design are emphasized in relation to business & economics problems.  Students successfully completing this course will be able to perform the statistical analysis portion of a college research project. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; BA 100; MATH 171.

ECN 321 Economics of Labor Relations – 3 hrs.
The labor market and its relation to the overall economy; the development, structure, goals and policies of labor organizations; major issues in labor-management relations; problems of public policy, wage theories and wage determination. Successful completion of this course will enable students to identify and describe the major issues in labor and their relationship to overall economic conditions. Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102.

ECN 350 Economics of International Business – 3 hrs.             
An introduction to international economic problems and public policy responses. The course includes discussions of tariffs, quotas, exchange rate control, the balance of payments, international capital and labor movements and policies designed to encourage international economic stability and cooperation. Students successfully completing this course will be able to define and explain the major economic forces of the modern global business environment. Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102.

SSCI 347 Research Methods – 3 hrs.
This course teaches the basic principles and practices of the scientific method as applied to the behavioral sciences. By completing this course, students will be able to conduct a research project through all of its stages, including research design, implementation, analysis of results and drafting of a research paper. Students should also demonstrate proficiency in the broad research skills necessary for creating and testing hypotheses and in the evaluation of research in business, economics, psychology, sociology, criminal justice, education and biology.
 
PHIL 215 Ethics for Life and Career – 3 hrs.
This course explores the ethical dimensions of human experience, especially with respect to work, professions, careers and vocations. What is demanded of us as we enter into various careers? What would excellence in these fields require? Are there basic rules governing each profession, and if so, what broader goals do these rules serve? Are there basic rules or principles guiding human life in general? In all of these spheres of life, what does it mean to be good?

REL 300 Religion in Western Civilization – 3 hrs.
Presents an historical survey of religious practices, beliefs and narratives in Western civilization. Examines the major ways in which three western religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—have responded to important historical crises, with special focus on how sacred stories have shaped these responses. As a result of this course, students will be able to identify the characteristics that all world religions share; explain the impact of social and scientific developments on the study of religion; compare and critique the major practices and beliefs of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and trace the historical development of each.

ENG 247 Imaginative Writing: Poetry and Prose – 3 hrs.
Work in forms such as short story, lyric poem and creative nonfiction. Students will demonstrate originality and craft in at least one creative genre through a writing portfolio.

ENG 311 Expository Writing – 3 hrs.
Advanced writing course emphasizing clarity and coherence in expository expression. Students will submit writing portfolios demonstrating ability to fulfill a variety of writing tasks at a level of competence beyond the first year exit level.

ENG 341 Masters of World Literature – 3 hrs.
Selected readings from various periods and world literatures, all in English translation. Students will discuss works comparatively and discern values, patterns of behavior and uses of language in various texts.

ENG 382 Modern English Grammars - 3 hrs.
Explores structure of modern English. Students will analyze English sentences,
determine the constituents of a well-made sentence, and identify the form and
function of words and phrases. Students will also apply grammatical concepts to
classroom situations.

MATH 171 Elementary Statistics - 4 hrs.
An introduction to probability and statistics. Students satisfactorily completing this course will demonstrate skills in assignment of probability using permutations and combinations, distributions of random variables and statistics, and large sample theory, introduction to estimation and tests of significance.

NUR 301 Bridge to Professional Nursing –  5 hrs.  (3 hrs. theory, 2 hrs. lab/clinical)
Bridge to professional nursing is designed as a transition to baccalaureate nursing education. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to integrate the concepts of nursing, person, health and environment into professional nursing practice. Prerequisites: At least two semesters of English composition and completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure. Writing-intensive course.

NUR 405 Nursing Care in the Community –  4 hrs.  (2 hrs. theory, 2 hrs. clinical)
Nursing Care in the Community focuses on professional nursing practice that assists the community as a client. Content includes concepts of environmental health, epidemiology and care of the community. The student will understand community as a client is defined as an individual, family, aggregate or group. The student will be able to integrate critical thinking, the nursing process, research and holistic care as it pertains to the community. Prerequisites: Completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure.

NUR 406 Nursing Care of Older Adults –  3 hrs.  (2 hrs. theory, 1 hr. clinical)
Nursing Care of the Older Adult focuses on professional nursing practice that takes a holistic approach to nursing care for the older population. Content includes physical, psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and economic aspects of aging. An overview of the latest thinking on current topics including chronic illness and end-of-life will be presented. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to integrate critical thinking, the nursing process, research and holistic care. Students will demonstrate a strong foundation in the normal aging process and an understanding of concepts that will promote health and wellness in addition to common health care problems in the elderly and their related nursing care. Prerequisites: Completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure.

NUR 410 Nursing Leadership and Management – 2 hrs.
Nursing Leadership and Management focuses on the study of organizational leadership for nurses and management theories and their supporting concepts as they relate to professional nursing. The student will be able to integrate critical thinking, decision making, delegation, communication, power and conflict resolution as it contributes to the leadership role of the professional nurse. Prerequisites: Completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure.

NUR 413 Nursing Research – 3 hrs.
Nursing Research focuses on evidence-based practice (EBP) nursing research. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to select EBP nursing research and utilize this research in their nursing practice. Students will be able to understand the research process and research statistics. Prerequisites: Completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure and Math 171. Writing-intensive course.

NUR 423 Advanced Concepts of Pathophysiology – 4 hrs.
Advanced Concepts of Pathophysiology examines pathophysiological and psychological aspects of alterations in major body systems. Emphasis is on the holistic nature of human responses to health alterations. Understanding disease processes promotes better decision making in assessing, planning and implementing care of clients and is essential for professional nursing practice.

PSYC 131 General Psychology 3 hrs.
This course provides a broad overview of the science of psychology including its main sub-disciplines, such as abnormal psychology, motivation, personality, memory, learning, emotions, therapy and biopsychology. By completing this course, students should be able to demonstrate an increased understanding of themselves and others, show appreciation for the nature and range of the science of psychology, identify the career possibilities that are available in the field of psychology and show themselves proficient in the scientific methods employed in psychological research.
 
PSYC/SOC 205 The Family 3 hrs.
This course examines the basic dynamics of family relationships from both psychological and sociological perspectives. By completing this course, students should be able to explain the major family structures and the family life cycle, identify typical patterns that develop within families, show proficiency in the practical skills for handling family conflict and describe the reciprocal influence of family life, culture and society.
 
 
PSYC/SOC  209 Social Psychology - 3 hrs.
The purpose of this course is to introduce the field of social psychology. There are three major sub-goals: (1) To introduce the ways in which social psychologists think about and approach the world. One of the recurring themes will be that social psychology relies on experimental studies of the social processes that surround us in everyday life. The results of such experiments sometimes do, and sometimes do not, support intuitions that people might have about social behavior. (2) To introduce the body of knowledge and underlying principles that currently exist in the field. (3) To encourage thought about the implications of social-psychological research for daily life. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or PSYC 131.Offered spring alternate years.
 
PSYC 240 Theories of Personality - 3 hrs.
This course focuses on the principles and theories of normal personality development and adjustment, with emphasis on stress, coping skills and communication. By completing this course, students should be able to explain how to cope with common problems encountered at each stage of the adult life-cycle, demonstrate an awareness of how to derive greater fulfillment from his/her relationships with others, show improved communication skills by learning the basic ways people communicate, and identify his/her own needs and motives, and analyze how these impact on our
relationships by discussing the role of childhood experiences, physical constitution, and the environment in forming our needs and motives. Prerequisite: PSYC 131

PSYC 251 Developmental Psychology - 3 hrs.
This course considers the development of an individual from conception through
adolescence. By completing this course, students should be able to describe their
own childhood and explain the influence it has had on shaping their adult personality,
identify the main content areas in the study of human development and describe and
critique the impact of governmental policies on children so as to become informed
participants in shaping public policy.

PSYC 326 Introduction to Counseling – 3 hrs.
This course covers the basic principles and techniques of counseling. By completing this course, students will be able to articulate the major approaches to counseling (e.g., action-oriented therapies, experiential/emotive-oriented therapies, cognitive behavioral therapies, group approaches, and systems approaches), demonstrate specific skills commonly used in counseling, understand common issues typically faced by counselors, appreciate the mechanics of the healing process and understand career possibilities in the field of counseling. Prerequisite: PSYC 324 or PSYC 361 (or permission of instructor).
 
PSYC 361 Abnormal Psychology – 3 hrs.
This course surveys a range of major pathological behavioral patterns identified by the DSM-IV-TR and discusses the theories and diagnoses of these patterns. By completing this course, students will be able to differentiate the major models of abnormal behavior and their implied methods of intervention, identify the basic types of mental disorders and explain the major issues confronted in abnormal psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 131 or PSYC 251.
 
PSYC 382 Biopsychology – 3 hrs.
This course studies the development, structure and functioning of the central nervous system in the context of its relations to principles and theories of human behavior. By completing this course, students will be able to identify the major centers of the brain and basic mechanics of brain functioning, explain the complexity of the memory process and how the mind and body affect each other, and summarize the dominant biological processes that interact with the mind to influence perception, emotion and behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 131; also recommended prerequisites: BIO 211 or BIO 241 or CHEM 175.

SOC 243 Social Problems 3 hrs.
This course is designed to present an enlightened analytical review, understanding, and interpretation of contemporary social problems within the context of broad social and structural forces that make America what it is today. Emphasis is on the links between specific modern social problems and broader structural issues of inequality
and the economic priorities in the United States today. Strategies for dealing with or solving social problems will be explored. Those who successfully complete the course will be able to identify and analyze the elements of most of the major social problems, especially in the United States.
 
SOC 310 Race and Ethnicity 3 hrs.
This course will discuss the concepts of race, ethnicity, dominant group vs. the minority group status, human diversity as well as the concepts of discrimination, racism, attitudes, prejudice and stereotyping in this concept. It will also discuss various racial, ethnic, religious, nationality, linguistic, and cultural groups in the U.S. in particular, and the human diversity all over the world in general.
 
SOC 320 Social Organization 3 hrs.
A study of the structures and processes of social organization – from the small group to complex bureaucratic institutions. Attention will be devoted to exploring the nature of life in an “organizational society” and the relationship of organizations to their social, cultural, political, economic, and natural environment. Those who successfully
complete the course will be able to identify basic principles of social organizations, as well as to analyze and evaluate specific organizations. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 243 Social Problems - 3 hrs.
This course is designed to present an enlightened analytical review, understanding,
and interpretation of contemporary social problems within the context of broad social
and structural forces that make America what it is today. Emphasis is on the links
between specific modern social problems and broader structural issues of inequality
and the economic priorities in the United States today. Strategies for dealing with or
solving social problems will be explored. Those who successfully complete the course
will be able to identify and analyze the elements of most of the major social problems,
especially in the United States.

WS 300 Global Issues – 3 hrs.
Upon satisfactorily completing this course, students will have a variety of perspectives on global events and issues and will understand the impact of their actions or inaction as global citizens.
 
WS 320 Leadership and Service – 3 hrs.
Through this course, students will be paired with a non-profit organization in their local, regional or global community to examine leadership issues within the organization and offer their assistance as a model of servant leadership. Purposeful reflection exercises will explore connections between leadership theories and their experiential service activities. Students completing this course will understand leadership theory, identify the impact of service upon diverse stakeholders and analyze the connection between service and leadership.
 

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